Friday, September 7, 2012

REMEMBER THE SIXTIES?


BLURB:  MAKE LOVE NOT WAR
Make love, not war was the catch cry of the 1960’s. Against a background of anti-war demonstrations, hippies and free love, Caroline’s life is in turmoil. Her soldier brother is on his way to the jungles of Vietnam. She discovers she is pregnant with her wealthy boss’ baby, and her draft dodger friend is on the run and needs her help. 


 HOW I REMEMBER THE SIXTIES:
At the risk of revealing my age, I have to say the 1960’s was my time. Mini skirts, stilettos (I’ve bunions to prove it), beehive hair dos, I couldn’t quite manage that, although I did tease the life out of my hair and regularly put in coloured rinses, French Plum or Rich Burgundy, were the colours I favoured. I can remember when the Beatles made their first visit out to Australia. A couple of girls I worked with were lucky enough to get tickets to their concerts, (we hated them, of course), they came to work the next days minus their voices, and stayed that way for about a week, because they had screamed so much.
We used manual typewriters in those days. One original and four copies of everything we typed. I don’t know how many blouses I ruined because I got ink on the sleeves from changing the typewriter ribbon or the black stuff off the carbon paper.
During this time the Vietnam War loomed in the background. The Australian government introduced conscription. It was in the form of a ballot, or the death lottery as many called it. All twenty year old males had to register, their birth dates were put into a barrel and a certain number were drawn out, and those young men had to report to the army and subsequently many of them were sent to Vietnam. This of course caused severe bitterness and division in the community, and even though the government denied it, was subject to abuse and unfairness. Rich men kept their sons at university so they didn’t have to go.  Conscientious objectors were thrown into prison. Only sons were called up, yet families with two or three eligible males didn’t have any of their boys called up.
I only had one brother, and I can clearly remember my father (a World War 2 veteran) vowing, that if his son got called up, he would protest on the steps of the parliament with a placard on his back.
There were protests marches, anti-war demonstrations, and things often turned violent. Not that I went to any of the protest marches, but a cousin of mine did and got trampled by a police horse. A very turbulent time in our history and I was right in the middle of it.
 Margaret
 
 

12 comments:

  1. Boy do I ever remember the 60s. Of course I was busy being a mom since two of my girls were born in the 60s. Loved your story Margaret.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jude,
      Thanks for dropping by. Ooh, you are older than me then, I was a working girl in the sixties, but I did get married in 1968.

      Cheers

      Margaret

      Delete
  2. Margaret, I can certainly relate! These were turbulent times, but nostalgic times as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sydell

      Glad you can relate. I know, the nostalgia really kicked in when I was writing this blog.
      Thanks for commenting.

      Cheers

      Margaret

      Delete
  3. Ah, Margaret! I remember the 60's, but from a little different perspective. I was a bit younger, I was in the fourth grade when the Beatles debuted on Ed Sullivan and had an older cousin in love with all of them, though I really didn't quite get the attraction right then. I had a brother-in-law in the service, and being a comic book junkie, his care packages were cradled with older Superman and Batman comic books (which I wouldn't have given up for anybody else, let me tell you!) and his letters home said grown men fought over those comic books. It was the day of the flipped up ends hairstyles, which my hair wouldn't do, and the day of the white go-go boots, which I adored. Paul Revere and the Raiders. Dick Clark. The casualties for that day in Viet Nam were listed in the top of the newscasts. Unless Laugh-In was looking at the news. Memories, girl. Were times better then? Yes. And No. Wonderful blog, Margaret. Thanks for the nostalgia.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Gail.
      Thanks for dropping by. The white go-go boots. I had a pair of them and combined with my mini-skirt, (had good legs in those days), I thought I looked gorgeous.

      Cheers

      Margaret

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  4. Love the nostalgia~ you describe it all so perfectly. well. The 60's were my time too; Also the 50's. lol Good blog, Margaret.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Joan,
      Thanks for dropping by and sharing in my trip down memory lane. I don't remember much of the fifties, well the tail end of it I do.

      Cheers

      Margaret

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  5. I loved the perspective of your Aussie point of view. The 60's were my coming of age era here in the States. Funny how we've tended to think of Vietnam as "our war" when other country's young men fought and died there as well. Thanks for the reminder.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Kathy,
      Sounds like there are a few of us belonging to the sixties era. There were other countries there including Australia and New Zealand, but your guys bore the brunt of it.

      Cheers

      Margaret

      Delete
  6. I wasn't very old in the sixties (not quite a teenager yet) but I still remember my sister's boyfriend being called up. My sister was distraught, but he got knocked back on medical reasons. He wasn't happy, she was delighted!

    Love your cover, the book sounds great!

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  7. The sixties were my decade, too. I remember those wretched typewriter ribbons, and soggy wet mimeograph machines. In college, I was an anti-war demonstrator, although, fortunately, was never the target of violence, especially as I attended sometimes with my baby on my hip. I had friends who went to the war and friends who didn't, and never disrespected any returning soldiers. I remember the Beatles coming to America and how exciting those days were. Must have seen their movie about 10 x's.
    Looking forward to your book, Margaret!

    ReplyDelete

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